Thursday, September 30, 2010

“Amy Fisher Scores Four Porn Movie Contracts - Limelife” plus 2 more

“Amy Fisher Scores Four Porn Movie Contracts - Limelife” plus 2 more


Amy Fisher Scores Four Porn Movie Contracts - Limelife

Posted: 29 Sep 2010 09:04 AM PDT

amy fisher

Amy Fisher image courtesy RadarOnline.com, via TK.

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Long Island Lolita Amy Fisher first made news in 1992 for having an affair with Joey Buttafuoco and then shooting his wife Mary Jo in the face. She was only 17 and spent 7 years in jail. Then, in 2007, the 35-year-old mom of three released a sex tape that also made big news. Today Amy Fisher's continuing down her road of sex and scandal...

She has four porn movies in the works!

According to Radar, Amy Fisher has signed on for four movies with Dreamzone Entertainment, a pornography producer and distributor. And Dreamzone is cashing in on Fisher's nasty notoriety, calling the first Amy Fisher porn flick "The Making of Amy Fisher: Porn Star."

Go here for onscreen updates!

Production for that film began in August, and reports suggest that it's releasing on video this week. Amy Fisher has appeared on "Maury" to talk about the film...and audiences everywhere are wondering why this mother of three is taking work that would harm her children so severely. No one wants to think about their parents having sex, especially not with multiple partners, and especially not on video!

Get more celeb news here...

But Amy Fisher has responded to the criticism, saying, "Our society loves sex ... Sex is beautiful, powerful, and simply put, no one has the right to tell me what I can or can not do with my own private parts. This time, I get to make the choices on what kind of movies I want to make, and I am excited to work with Dreamzone to make my dreams a reality."

Get more love and sex news here!

 

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Best bets: Facebook movie wants you to Like it - msnbc.com

Posted: 26 Sep 2010 09:58 AM PDT

Movies
The film is called "The Social Network," but everyone just calls it "The Facebook movie." And even those who think the history of a company — a tech company, nonetheless — sounds hella dull needs to give this one a chance. It fascinates from the start, thanks to the rapid-fire Aaron Sorkin ("The West Wing") dialogue and hypnotizing performance of Jesse Eisenberg as Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. Two hours go by in a blink, and you won't once think of surreptitiously checking your friends list while you're watching. Not to be missed, whether you have five friends or 5,000. (Opens Oct. 1.)

Related: Newsweek on the Facebook movie's dark message

As readers of Kazuo Ishiguro's novel know, Hailsham boarding school in "Never Let Me Go" is not your ordinary educational institution, and the children enrolled there are not ordinary kids. They have a horrible fate awaiting them, and part of the horror is in how calmly that fate is accepted by all the people in their world — themselves included. Keira Knightley, Carey Mulligan and hot new face Andrew Garfield (who also co-stars in "The Social Network") lead a cast that looks worthy of this chilling book. (Opens Oct. 1)

Andrew Garfield has prepped for Spidey role his whole life

October is filled with horror flicks, and "Let Me In" starts things off right away. The film is based on the Swedish novel about a vampire child "Let The Right One In," which was already made into a film in Sweden. The scares have been reportedly heightened for the American version — we hope that doesn't translate as "dumbed down." Because vampires are already scary, and little kid vampires are already extra-scary. (Opens Oct. 1)

TV

Many viewers call "The Good Wife"

the best new show of last season. Julianna Margulies stars as Alicia Florrick, whose husband was jailed after a sex and corruption scandal. Marguilies' Alicia is more than just a wronged wife — she's a mother, a lawyer, a woman, a daughter-in-law and a work colleague, and it seems one of those titles is always giving her trouble. The second season will include Dallas Roberts as Alicia's gay brother and Michael J. Fox as a lawyer who goes up against Alicia in court (Second season premieres Sept. 28, 10 p.m., CBS.)

  1. More Entertainment highlights

    1. You've had great TV specials, Charlie Brown

      Saturday marks the 60th birthday for the "Peanuts" pals. Here are five favorite TV specials.

    2. 'Sister Wives' family investigated for bigamy
    3. 'Star Wars' movies start 3-D rollout in 2012
    4. Bedbugs hit Howard Stern's studios, limo
    5. Four stars for epic, intimate 'Social Network' movie

Michael Chiklis has played a superpowered being before — he was The Thing in "Fantastic Four." In the new ABC show "No Ordinary Family," he plays the patriarch of a family whose members all gain special powers after a plane crash. Julie Benz, formerly of "Dexter," plays his wife. Is it "The Incredibles" come to life? (Premieres Sept. 28, 8 p.m., ABC.)

DVD
Some viewers didn't feel "Iron Man 2" lived up to the first film, others loved it for star Robert Downey Jr.'s wit and humor, and the introduction of Mickey Rourke as Russian villain Whiplash. The New York Daily News raved that it set a "gold standard for sequels." Gwyneth Paltrow , Don Cheadle, and Scarlett Johansson help fill out the blockbuster. (Out on DVD Sept. 28.

Aw, "Babies." In this documentary, cameras follow four children from birth through the first year of their life. There's an American baby of course, but the others, from Japan, Mongolia, and Namibia, are more fascinating for the very different ways they're raised. The Toronto Globe and Mail calls it "observant and funny and thoughtful too." (Out on DVD Sept. 28.)

Another DVD release this week goes straight for our nostalgia button. You may remember 1980s animated superhero He-Man, but his underrated twin sister, She-Ra, also had her own show. She was a female superhero when few but Wonder Woman existed, and kids of the 1980s can now pick up the first season of the TV series "She-Ra: Princess of Power" on DVD. (The entire series will be out next year.) For the honor of Greyskull! (Out on DVD Sept. 28.)

© 2010 MSNBC Interactive. Reprints

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Movie review: 'The Social Network' - Los Angeles Times

Posted: 29 Sep 2010 06:01 PM PDT

Could it be that the person who founded Facebook, the man who connected so many individuals that the total defies belief (500 million and counting), is himself incapable of close personal friendship? Is it possible that the world's youngest self-made billionaire, a 26-year-old whose creation unites people in 207 countries using 70 languages, is the loneliest guy on the planet?

If that sounds like a hell of a premise, you don't know the half of it. Smartly written by Aaron Sorkin, directed to within an inch of its life by David Fincher and anchored by a perfectly pitched performance by Jesse Eisenberg, "The Social Network" is a barn-burner of a tale that unfolds at a splendid clip.

Yet, while nothing is more au courant than the Facebook phenomenon, "Social Network" succeeds because its story is the stuff of archetypal movie drama. It marries the tradition of present-at-the-creation epics like "Dr. Ehrlich's Magic Bullet," "Madame Curie" and "Edison, the Man" with the familiar story of the corrupting power of ambition and success that allows audiences to feel, and not for the first time, that their ordinary lives have more meaning than those of the rich and famous.


Where "Social Network" departs from those earlier biopics is that, as played by Eisenberg, protagonist Mark Zuckerberg is introduced as extremely unlikable rather than heroic, a self-absorbed and arrogant 19-year-old Harvard sophomore who is as socially maladroit as he is fearsomely smart.

An actor who has nailed every discontented role he's had, including "Roger Dodger," "The Squid and the Whale" and "Adventureland," Eisenberg excels as someone whose success is fueled, in classic movie fashion, by resentments of all shapes and sizes. His Zuckerberg is so consumed by the drive to get even and gain status that no one is a match for the combination of ruthless focus and disinterested frigidity he brings to the table.

The opportunity to simultaneously portray and dissect this kind of compelling yet distant individual is an ideal fit for Fincher. Presented with an involving central character cold enough to suit his chilly but considerable filmmaking talents, the director does his best work, convincingly presenting a story about conflicts over intellectual property as if it were a fast-paced James Bond thriller.

"Social Network" is fluidly shot by Jeff Cronenweth with convincing production design by Donald Graham Burt, both Fincher regulars, and the director also has the benefit of working with Sorkin's strong and persuasive script. As fans of TV's "The West Wing" well remember, Sorkin writes great crackling dialogue that dramatically represents the dynamics of power relations, and he puts that gift to great use here. Both his writing and the unnerving music by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross bring so much propulsive energy to the project that resistance is all but futile.

Although the film is based on Ben Mezrich's "The Accidental Billionaires," Sorkin did his own research into the story and his treatment doesn't have an ounce of fat on it. Though there has been talk of "Social Network" having Rashomon elements, that is something of a red herring. The film's characters naturally have differing viewpoints and details are argued over, but the basic thrust of this tale never wavers, no matter whose eyes events are being told through.

"The Social Network" begins by positing that it was a very specific social resentment that got Zuckerberg started on his road to billions. The film opens at an undergraduate bar near the Harvard campus in the fall of 2003 with Zuckerberg getting dumped by his girlfriend Erica ( Rooney Mara, soon to be Lisbeth Salander in the Fincher-directed versions of the Stieg Larsson trilogy). Going out with him, she says tartly, is "like dating a Stairmaster."

Furious at this rejection, Zuckerberg stomps back to his dorm and, with the help of roommate and best friend Eduardo Saverin (the gifted shape-shifter Andrew Garfield), takes revenge by doing some adroit hacking and coming up with Facemash, a site that enables students to vote on which Harvard women are the hottest. It gets 22,000 hits in two hours and crashes the university's system.

That stunt attracts the attention of two of the school's elite, rowers and identical twins Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss (played, with the help of computer wizardry, by two unrelated actors, Armie Hammer and Josh Pence). They and friend Divya Narendra (Max Minghella) hire him to work on a university dating service they have in mind called Harvard Connection. Almost simultaneously, Zuckerberg, funded by best friend Saverin, starts "thefacebook," which eventually morphs into you know what.

After these dynamics are established, "Social Network" jumps us a few years into the future, to separate but equally acrimonious lawsuits brought against Zuckerman by the Winklevosses and by Saverin, all of whom, albeit for different reasons, are upset enough with their erstwhile colleague and friend to drag him into legal proceedings.

Part of "Social Network's" energy comes from the alacrity, courtesy of the brisk editing of Angus Wall and Kirk Baxter, with which it jumps between the taking of two sets of depositions and the film's depiction of the events that led to Facebook, and Zuckerberg, getting rich and famous. This includes the eventual involvement of Napster co-founder Sean Parker (a quite-convincing Justin Timberlake), a personality as seductive as he was divisive.

Another red herring about "Social Network" is how true to life these characterizations and this film are. It's a red herring because movies, even well-intentioned documentaries, distort reality by their very nature. Zuckerberg's adherents say the film is unfair to their man, and it may or may not be, but given that a New Yorker writer who interviewed him characterized the Facebook founder as "distant and disorienting, a strange mixture of shy and cocky," Eisenberg's characterization doesn't seem that far off the mark.

All that really matters about "Social Network" is that it be convincing in movie terms, and it very much is that. Very likely gritting his teeth and agreeing is Zuckerberg himself. Someone who donated $100 million to the Newark, N.J., public schools just as this film was opening the New York Film Festival is probably worried that with all his billions he may forever be a prisoner of the film's uncharitable portrayal, just as gifted actress Marion Davies was similarly blindsided by the talentless character based on her in "Citizen Kane." Facebook may be powerful, but impressive movies have a force that cannot be denied.

kenneth.turan@latimes.com

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