Tuesday, October 19, 2010

“Tom Hardy to be in the next Batman movie - Washington Post” plus 2 more

“Tom Hardy to be in the next Batman movie - Washington Post” plus 2 more


Tom Hardy to be in the next Batman movie - Washington Post

Posted: 13 Oct 2010 12:36 PM PDT

Tom Hardy was the breakout star of "Inception." And apparently director Christopher Nolan liked him enough to invite him to be in his next Batman movie.

As Deadline reports, Hardy will have a lead role in the next, yet-to-be-titled Batman film, to be directed by Nolan. It's unclear whom Hardy will play, but Deadline implies he could be a major villain, which has led to rampant online speculation that he's the new Riddler, even though his "Inception" co-star, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, was already rumored to be taking on the part. The movie is reportedly slated to begin production in the spring.

Rumors and online speculation aside, what is clear is that Hardy -- who starred in the little-seen "Bronson," and will be seen next in the big-screen adaptation of John Le Carre's "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy" alongside Gary Oldman and Colin Firth -- is zooming his way toward It Boy status.

Source: Deadline.com

Read more in Celebritology:

Fans take the 'Transformers' quiz

Talking with Edward Norton, star of 'Stone'

Eric Stoltz in his brief 'Back to the Future' role

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'A Woman, a Gun and a Noodle Shop': An odd Chinese remake of a Coen brothers movie - Cleveland Plain Dealer

Posted: 07 Oct 2010 08:58 PM PDT

Published: Friday, October 08, 2010, 12:00 AM

By Stephen Whitty/Newark Star-Ledger


Some directors like to get down and dirty with their characters. The Coen brothers prefer to observe them from a mountaintop.

Sitting back, looking down (sometimes literally, from high-angled shots), they watch as they run in circles. The smart characters know they don't know everything. The doomed ones think they do.

That pattern was set with their first film, "Blood Simple," a Southwestern noir that started with a couple of adulterous lovers and grew into a blackly comic mess of too-hastily buried corpses and fatally confused criminals.

And now it gets a remake -- set in old China.

That's an odd decision, and it gets odder. The director is Zhang Yimou, perhaps the mainland's finest filmmaker, and an auteur whose deeply colored, beautifully pictorial dramas include "Raise High the Red Lantern" and "Ju Dou."

Really, a nasty crime story? Isn't this a Hong Kong job, something maybe for Ringo Lam or John Woo?

Well, yes. But over the last decade, Chinese cinema -- at least the approved-for-export kind -- has changed. Modern, moody, fast-cut Cantonese-style thrillers have been de-emphasized. Lush, Mandarin period pieces are now preferred.

So the time of "A Woman, a Gun and a Noodle Shop" is now (vaguely) 17th century. The desolate setting is a rocky, red-and-yellow striped desert. The panoramas include huge moons and royal-blue nights.

Framed against these massive backgrounds, the characters only seem punier as they futilely plot against each other. Nobody really knows everything that's going on. Almost everyone eventually makes one crucial, ignorant mistake.

The problem is that Zhang makes these characters too ignorant. The Coens have always been overly fond of moronic heroes, but Zhang pushes things into vaudeville territory.

One character has a pair of buck teeth that would embarrass Bugs Bunny. Every scared female squeals like a stuck pig. People trying to be stealthy walk on exaggerated tiptoe; people running away have to fall down, at least twice.

And none of it is funny.

About halfway in, luckily, Zhang begins to relax and go for mordant black humor instead of idiotic slapstick. He's helped immeasurably in this by Sun Honglei as the crooked officer drawn into a cuckold's desperate murder-for-hire plot.

Sun is tense, silent and determined, and managed to maintain his dignity throughout -- a difficult thing, in this picture. The last half-hour of the film, as things spin faster out of control, and he and the resourceful wife finally face off, will make you think of the Coens' classic.

And, also, miss it a bit. Because yes, the brothers did, and do, occasionally look down on their dim, deluded characters. But they've never talked down to their audiences.

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Movie Trailer #2: David O Russell’s ‘The Fighter’ - Slashfilm.com

Posted: 17 Oct 2010 10:54 PM PDT

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