Saturday, January 22, 2011

“Conn. library cancels Michael Moore movie ’Sicko’ under pressure from officials - Middletown Press” plus 1 more

“Conn. library cancels Michael Moore movie ’Sicko’ under pressure from officials - Middletown Press” plus 1 more


Conn. library cancels Michael Moore movie ’Sicko’ under pressure from officials - Middletown Press

Posted: 21 Jan 2011 11:50 PM PST

ENFIELD (AP) — The Enfield Public Library has canceled a screening of the Michael Moore documentary "Sicko" about the American health care system under pressure from the town council and mayor, leading to accusations of censorship.

The screening was canceled Wednesday, a day after a resident complained about the film. Several councilors also objected to the film, which praises government-run health care.

Republican Mayor Scott Kaupin asked the town manager to talk to library Director Henry Dutcher, who said he was told by the town manager to cancel the screening. Kaupin said the decision to show the movie was stupid and threatened the library's funding.

"The sentiment by the majority is that it's a poor choice and that they should definitely reconsider," Kaupin told the Journal Inquirer.

Dutcher said he could not remember when the council last intervened in the library's programming and had a film pulled.

Democratic Councilor Cynthia Mangini called it censorship and compared it to banning books.

Peter Chase, chairman of the Connecticut Library Association's Intellectual Freedom Committee, called the decision "absolutely deplorable."

"The health care debate in America is exactly the kind of controversial issue that people need information on, and this is exactly what the public library should be doing," he said. "Can you imagine what would happen to state libraries if individual town governments could just withdraw the materials they didn't like?"

Moore's film prompted an argument in May at a Missouri high school. A student in St. Charles County filed a complaint after a teacher failed to get administrative approval before using "Sicko" as part of a final exam.

The student said she didn't believe it was right for students to hear only one side of the debate. The school district said the matter would be handled in the teacher evaluation process. Continued...

The screening of Moore's 2007 Academy Award-nominated documentary that critiqued the American health care system, was to have been part of the Enfield library's new nonfiction film series.

Andrew Schneider, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Connecticut, said "a free society like ours suffers when government officials like the mayor take this type of action.

"The government should never take action that limits the public's access to information or ideas," Schneider said.

Dutcher said the Moore film was the second in an occasional series of nonfiction films chosen by his staff featuring subjects including health care, education and the environment. The first film, A PBS "Frontline" documentary about health care called "Sick Around the World," was shown Jan. 7.

Other films scheduled in the series include "An Inconvenient Truth," former Vice President Al Gore's film about climate change, and "Trouble the Waters," a documentary about the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

ENFIELD (AP) — The Enfield Public Library has canceled a screening of the Michael Moore documentary "Sicko" about the American health care system under pressure from the town council and mayor, leading to accusations of censorship.

The screening was canceled Wednesday, a day after a resident complained about the film. Several councilors also objected to the film, which praises government-run health care.

Republican Mayor Scott Kaupin asked the town manager to talk to library Director Henry Dutcher, who said he was told by the town manager to cancel the screening. Kaupin said the decision to show the movie was stupid and threatened the library's funding.

"The sentiment by the majority is that it's a poor choice and that they should definitely reconsider," Kaupin told the Journal Inquirer.

Dutcher said he could not remember when the council last intervened in the library's programming and had a film pulled.

Democratic Councilor Cynthia Mangini called it censorship and compared it to banning books.

Peter Chase, chairman of the Connecticut Library Association's Intellectual Freedom Committee, called the decision "absolutely deplorable."

"The health care debate in America is exactly the kind of controversial issue that people need information on, and this is exactly what the public library should be doing," he said. "Can you imagine what would happen to state libraries if individual town governments could just withdraw the materials they didn't like?"

Moore's film prompted an argument in May at a Missouri high school. A student in St. Charles County filed a complaint after a teacher failed to get administrative approval before using "Sicko" as part of a final exam.

The student said she didn't believe it was right for students to hear only one side of the debate. The school district said the matter would be handled in the teacher evaluation process.

The screening of Moore's 2007 Academy Award-nominated documentary that critiqued the American health care system, was to have been part of the Enfield library's new nonfiction film series.

Andrew Schneider, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Connecticut, said "a free society like ours suffers when government officials like the mayor take this type of action.

"The government should never take action that limits the public's access to information or ideas," Schneider said.

Dutcher said the Moore film was the second in an occasional series of nonfiction films chosen by his staff featuring subjects including health care, education and the environment. The first film, A PBS "Frontline" documentary about health care called "Sick Around the World," was shown Jan. 7.

Other films scheduled in the series include "An Inconvenient Truth," former Vice President Al Gore's film about climate change, and "Trouble the Waters," a documentary about the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

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Anne Hathaway Lands Role of Catwoman in New Batman Movie - Associated Content

Posted: 20 Jan 2011 06:19 AM PST

How do you follow up an award winning performance by the late Heath Ledger? Cast Anne Hathaway, of course. While the actual plot for "The Dark Knight Rises," Christopher Nolan's newest
Batman movie remains under wraps, a press release has confirmed that Anne Hathaway will play Selina Kyle in the film, although the release said nothing of Catwoman, Kyle's whip wielding secret identity. Hathaway joins a distinguished line of women, most recently including Halle Berry, to play the role. Additionally, Tom Hardy from "Inception" will play Bane, a villain that is responsible for doing serious damage to Batman/Bruce Wayne in the comics by inflicting back damage on the super-hero.

Faced with the impossible to follow up Ledger's astonishing performance as the Joker in "The Dark Knight", "The Dark Knight Rises" seems like it is going to rely on several characters to move the story along. That idea is not necessarily a bad thing, but memories of "Spider-Man 3" and the mashed up storyline that brought too many characters to light and a complicated story are fresh in the minds of super-hero fans everywhere. Still, if anyone can pull off a great movie with a lot of characters it is Christopher Nolan.

While Nolan's "The Dark Knight" centered around the Joker versus Batman face off, Harvey Dent as Two Face had a role to play in the film, and the director would do well to follow that winning formula. Since the story for "The Dark Knight Rises" has not yet been made available, rumors and fan reaction are bound to swing in all sorts of different directions. Still, Hathaway would seem more than capable of playing both Selina Kyle and Catwoman, and while Hardy does not exactly fit the physical profile of Bane, his performance in "Inception" solidifies his onscreen abilities. Bascialy, Nolan has put together a stellar starting three with Hardy, Hathaway, and Bale.

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