Tuesday, February 1, 2011

“On Tonight: Taraji's TV Movie, A Red Sox Town Hall - Hartford Courant (blog)” plus 1 more

“On Tonight: Taraji's TV Movie, A Red Sox Town Hall - Hartford Courant (blog)” plus 1 more


On Tonight: Taraji's TV Movie, A Red Sox Town Hall - Hartford Courant (blog)

Posted: 30 Jan 2011 11:32 PM PST

Taraji P. Henson, the Oscar nominated actress from "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" stars as a mother who won't stand idly as her son is taken by her ex-husband to Korea in the new TV movie "Taken from Me: The Tiffany Rubin Story" (Lifetime, 9 p.m.). Based on a true story, it also features Terry O'Quinn, in one of his first TV roles since "Lost." 

The actual Tiffany Rubin and her son take part in the supplemental special "Behind the Headlines: The Tiffany Rubin Story" (Lifetime, 11 p.m.).

Black History Month gets a head start with a look back into pop culture in the new series "Way Black When" (TVOne, 10 p.m. and 1 a.m.), in which a decade is revisited nightly each week, starting with the 70s. Sinbad hosts such figures as Jim Brown, Dick Gregory, Jody Whatley and Freda Payne this wee

It's the least democratic of sports, at least in the way the major leagues are managed. Nonetheless they're throwing a "2011 Red Sox Town Hall" (NESN, 9 p.m.) in Boston, where the team brass will interact with the fans and "give them a chance to ask any question." The event will be held at 7 in the WGBH studio; leave your beach balls at home.

It's Duke at UConn (ESPN2, 7 p.m.) in what may be a close game in women's basketball -- they have a longer winning streak than the Huskies, for example. In other women's games, it's Boston College at Wake Forest (NESN, 7 p.m.).

In men's hoops, it's Maryland-Eastern Shore at Hampton (ESPNU, 4:30 p.m.), Louisville at Georgetown (ESN, 7 p.m.), Florida at Mississippi State (CBSCS, 7 p.m.), New Hampshire at Vermont (CSN, 7:30 p.m.), Canisius at Fairfield (MSG, 7:30 p.m.), Alabama State at Texas Southern (ESPNU, 9 p.m.) and Texas at Texas A&M (ESPN, 9 p.m.).

In NBA action, it's Nuggets at Nets (YES, 7 p.m.) and Celtics at Lakers (ESPN2, 1:30 p.m.).

And it's the AHL All-Star Game (NESN, 7 p.m.) from Hershey, Penn.

"Lie to Me" (Fox, 9 p.m.) reaches its third season finale with an investigation in the death of a social network. If it's not renewed, it may be the last episode of "Lie to Me" ever.

Tonight's episode of "Skins" (MTV, 10 p.m.) is a monumental one: It's the one they edited so as not to be charged with child pornography because of one scene where a central underaged character runs down the street naked. Hubbub over the controversey has resulted in a number of advertisers pulling commercials. The audience has also dropped from 3.3 million for its premiere two weeks ago as opposed to 1.2 million last week.

Last night's dresses at the SAG Awards are discussed on both "Screen Actors Guild Awards Red Carpet Fashion Wrap" (TV Guide Network, 8 p.m.) and "Fashion Police" (E! 10 p.m.). 

Everybody gets in the act: "Border Wars" (National Geographic Channel, 10 p.m.) has a Super Bowl-related episode.

Alan Thicke guest stars on "I'm in the Band" (Disney, 8:30 p.m.); Mean Suvari guest stars on "The Cape" (NBC, 9 p.m.). Lily Tomlin is guest judge on "RuPaul's Drag Race" (Logo, 10 p.m.).

Having found a new baker to join the team, a fourth season of "Cake Boss" (TLC, 9 p.m.) begins with an assignment to make a circus cake. A second season starts for "Donald J. Trump's Fabulous World of Golf" (Golf, 9 p.m.). And William Shatner begins a third season as interviewer/amateur shrink on "Shatner's Raw Nerve" (Bio, 10 p.m.). His first patient, er, guest, is Carol Burnett, and then Marilu Henner, recently more famous for her memory than her acting skills, sits for a second episode. 

On "The Bachelor" (ABC, 8 p.m.), what happens in Vegas ends up at the rose ceremony. But you could also watch the Cameron Diaz movie "What Happens in Vegas" (FX, 8 and 10:30 p.m.).

How about putting "Two and a Half Men" (CBS, 9 p.m.) on hiatus every time Charlie Sheen is in rehab?

Turner Classic Movies salutes those winning Governor's Awards by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Francis Ford Coppola, who will win the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award, is represented by his 1969 film "The Rain People" (midnight). Those receiving honorary Oscars this include Jean-Luc Godard, represented by his "Breathless" (8 p.m.); Eli Wallach, represented by his performance in "Baby Doll" (10 p.m.) and historian Kevin Brownlow, who made the documentary "The Tramp and the Dictator" (2 a.m.) about the making of Chaplin's "The Great Dictator" (3 a.m.).

Daytime Talk

Regis and Kelly: Barbara Walters, Johnny Galecki, Leo Laporte, Joy Philbin. The View: Billy Gardell, Camille Grammer. The Talk: Taraji P. Henson, Stefanie Powers. Ellen DeGeneres: Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Marisa Miller, the Band Perry. Wendy Williams: Kim Zolciak, Guy Fieri.

Late Talk

David Letterman: Justin Bieber, Pauley Perrette, Best Coast. Jay Leno: Adam Sandler, Larry the Cable Guy, Esperanza Spalding. Jimmy Kimmel: Juliana Margulies, Matthew Bomer, the JaneDear Girls. Jimmy Fallon: Bill Paxton, Adam Scott, Edie Brickell. Craig Ferguson: Rachael Ray. Tavis Smiley: Ed O'Neill, Meghan Linsey, Joshua Scott Jones. Carson Daly: Lemmy Kilmister, Ryan Case, Delta Spirit. Jon Stewart: Bill Gates. Stephen Colbert: Samer Shehata, Dr. Paul Offit. Conan O'Brien: Amy Poehler, Tim Heidecker & Eric Wareham, Randy Rogers. George Lopez: Jamie Foxx, Jake Johnson. Chelsea Handler: Kevin Smith, Brad Wollack, Dov Davidoff, Natasha Leggero.

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John Barry, composer of Bond movies' music, dies - Arts & Entertainment - Charleston Daily ... - Charleston Daily Mail

Posted: 31 Jan 2011 11:31 PM PST

LONDON - Five-time Oscar-winning composer John Barry, who wrote music for a dozen James Bond films, including "You Only Live Twice" and "Goldfinger" but couldn't persuade a jury that he composed the suave spy's theme music, has died. He was 77.

Barry died in New York, where he had lived for some time, on Sunday, his family said. The family did not release the cause of death.

Though his work on the Bond films is among his most famous, the English-born composer wrote a long list of scores, including for "Midnight Cowboy," "Dances with Wolves" and "Body Heat." He was proud of writing both for big action blockbusters and smaller films.

He won two Oscars for "Born Free" in 1966, for best score and best song. He also earned statuettes for the scores to "The Lion in Winter" (1968), "Out of Africa" (1985) and "Dances with Wolves" (1990).

His association with Agent 007 began with "Dr. No" in 1962, although his contribution to that film was not credited and is in dispute.

Monty Norman, who was credited as the composer for "Dr. No," sued The Sunday Times in 2001 for reporting that Barry had composed the theme, working from scraps of Norman's work. Norman won the case, collecting 30,000 pounds ($48,000).

Barry testified that he was paid 250 pounds to work on the theme music, developing the guitar line from part of Norman's song "Bad Sign, Good Sign," but agreed that Norman would get the credit. He was asked whether Norman wrote the theme and responded "absolutely not."

In later years, Barry limited his comment on the case to saying, "If I didn't write it, why did they ask me to do the other ones?"

He subsequently wrote music for "Goldfinger," "From Russia with Love," "Thunderball," "You Only Live Twice," "On Her Majesty's Secret Service," "Diamonds are Forever," "The Man with the Golden Gun," "Moonraker," "Octopussy," "A View to a Kill" and "The Living Daylights."

Born John Barry Prendergast, he recalled growing up "exposed to the fantasy life of Hollywood" at the eight theaters his father owned in Northern England.

LONDON - Five-time Oscar-winning composer John Barry, who wrote music for a dozen James Bond films, including "You Only Live Twice" and "Goldfinger" but couldn't persuade a jury that he composed the suave spy's theme music, has died. He was 77.

Barry died in New York, where he had lived for some time, on Sunday, his family said. The family did not release the cause of death.

Though his work on the Bond films is among his most famous, the English-born composer wrote a long list of scores, including for "Midnight Cowboy," "Dances with Wolves" and "Body Heat." He was proud of writing both for big action blockbusters and smaller films.

He won two Oscars for "Born Free" in 1966, for best score and best song. He also earned statuettes for the scores to "The Lion in Winter" (1968), "Out of Africa" (1985) and "Dances with Wolves" (1990).

His association with Agent 007 began with "Dr. No" in 1962, although his contribution to that film was not credited and is in dispute.

Monty Norman, who was credited as the composer for "Dr. No," sued The Sunday Times in 2001 for reporting that Barry had composed the theme, working from scraps of Norman's work. Norman won the case, collecting 30,000 pounds ($48,000).

Barry testified that he was paid 250 pounds to work on the theme music, developing the guitar line from part of Norman's song "Bad Sign, Good Sign," but agreed that Norman would get the credit. He was asked whether Norman wrote the theme and responded "absolutely not."

In later years, Barry limited his comment on the case to saying, "If I didn't write it, why did they ask me to do the other ones?"

He subsequently wrote music for "Goldfinger," "From Russia with Love," "Thunderball," "You Only Live Twice," "On Her Majesty's Secret Service," "Diamonds are Forever," "The Man with the Golden Gun," "Moonraker," "Octopussy," "A View to a Kill" and "The Living Daylights."

Born John Barry Prendergast, he recalled growing up "exposed to the fantasy life of Hollywood" at the eight theaters his father owned in Northern England.

"Rather than talkie-talkie movies, I liked films with excitement and adventure, because they were the ones that had the music," Barry said in an interview with The Guardian newspaper in 1999.

"It was nice to have the very commercial Bondian thing . . . and then at the same time have these smaller movies which were artistically more interesting to do," he said.

Other films included "Robin and Marian," "Somewhere in Time," "The Cotton Club," "Peggy Sue Got Married" and "Howard the Duck." He was also nominated for Oscars for his scores of "Mary, Queen of Scots" in 1971 and "Chaplin" in 1992.

Barry trained as a pianist, studied counterpoint with York cathedral organist Francis Jackson, and later took up the trumpet. He founded a jazz group, the John Barry Seven, in 1957.

The group teamed with singer Adam Faith, scoring hits with "What Do You Want?" and "Poor Me," and Barry moved into film work when Faith was tapped to star in "Beat Girl" (titled "Living for Kicks" in the United States).

"The James Bond movies came because we were successful in the pop music world, with a couple of big instrumental hits. They thought I knew how to write instrumental hit music," Barry said in an interview with The Associated Press in 1991.

In an interview in 2008 with The Irish Times, Barry said his success "was not that difficult."

"If you hit the right formula, if you have an instinct for music, if you apply it, if you have the good fortune to meet with certain people who teach you well . . . I didn't find it all that difficult," he said.

Barry was divorced three times. He is survived by his wife Laurie, his four children and five grandchildren. A private funeral was planned, the family said.

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